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Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

4 edition of Cellular biology, nucleic acids and viruses found in the catalog.

Cellular biology, nucleic acids and viruses

New York Academy of Sciences.

Cellular biology, nucleic acids and viruses

by New York Academy of Sciences.

  • 164 Want to read
  • 33 Currently reading

Published by The Academy in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • O"Connor, Basil, 1892-1972.,
  • Cytology.,
  • Virology -- Research.,
  • Nucleic acids.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby V.G. Allfrey [and others] Consulting editor: Thomas M. Rivers.
    SeriesSpecial publications of the New York Academy of Sciences ;, v. 5
    ContributionsAllfrey, Vincent G. 1921-, Rivers, Thomas M. 1888-1962, ed.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQH581 .N4
    The Physical Object
    Pagination414 p.
    Number of Pages414
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL6242046M
    LC Control Number58001115

    Viruses are very small and to reliably visualize them, stains and electron microscopy are needed. Each virus is a nucleic acid (RNA or DNA) surrounded by a coating, referred to as an envelope or capsid. Viruses encode capsid proteins which encase the nucleic acid. Sometimes, viral proteins combine with host proteins to make the envelope. Nucleic acids are the biopolymers, or large biomolecules, essential to all known forms of term nucleic acid is the overall name for DNA and RNA. They are composed of nucleotides, which are the monomers made of three components: a 5-carbon sugar, a phosphate group and a nitrogenous the sugar is a compound ribose, the polymer is RNA (ribonucleic acid); if the sugar is derived.

      He found it behaved as an acid, so the material was renamed nucleic acid. Nucleic acid refers to both DNA and RNA. In , the first x-ray diffraction pattern of DNA was published by Astbury and Bell. In , Watson and Crick described the structure of DNA. While discovered in eukaryotes, over time scientists realized a cell need not have a. Coronaviruses (CoVs) are enveloped positive-sense RNA viruses. The club-like spikes projecting out from their surface gave them the name. Coronaviruses possess an unusual large RNA genome as well as a unique replication strategy. Coronaviruses cause a variety of diseases in animals ranging from cows, pigs to chicken, and other birds. In humans, coronaviruses can cause potentially lethal.

    Molecular virology is the study of viruses on a molecular level. Viruses are submicroscopic parasites that replicate inside host cells. They are able to successfully infect and parasitize all kinds of life forms- from microorganisms to plants and animals- and as a result viruses have more biological diversity than the rest of the bacterial, plant, and animal kingdoms combined. Most molecular biologists think that viruses originated from fragments of cellular nucleic acid. Which of the following observations supports this theory? Viral genomes could be similar to the genome of the host cell.


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Cellular biology, nucleic acids and viruses by New York Academy of Sciences. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Cellular Biology, Nucleic Acids and Viruses Special Publications of the New York Academy of Sciences, Volume V: This Monograph is Dedicated to Basil O'Connor to Celebrate His Sixty-Fifth Birthday] [Edited Cellular biology Thomas M.

Rivers] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Cellular biology: nucleic acids and viruses. New York: New York Academy of Sciences, (OCoLC) Named Person: Basil O'Connor; Basil O'Connor; Basil O'Connor: Material Type: Conference publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Vincent G Allfrey; Thomas M Rivers; Basil O'Connor.

Nucleic Acid Strands Grow in the 5′ → 3′ Direction. All RNA and DNA synthesis, both cellular and viral, proceeds in the same chemical direction: from the 5′ (phosphate) end to the 3′ (hydroxyl) end (see Figure ).Nucleic acid chains are assembled from 5′ triphosphates of ribonucleosides or deoxyribonucleosides.

Strand growth is energetically unfavorable but is driven by the Author: Harvey Lodish, Arnold Berk, S Lawrence Zipursky, Paul Matsudaira, David Baltimore, James Darnell.

Photochemistry and Photobiology of Nucleic Acids: Volume II, Biology is a collection of papers that deals with the biological effects due to stable UV induced alterations in critical cellular macromolecules, including cell death, growth delay, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis.

Enzyme and nonenzyme virus-related components with applications in in vitro manipulation of nucleic acids are described in detail. Special emphasis is placed on the role of viral enzymes in cloning, sequencing, genome analysis, and RNA biology.

A virion consists of a nucleic acid core, an outer protein coating or capsid, and sometimes an outer envelope made of protein and phospholipid membranes derived from the host cell.

Viruses may also contain additional proteins, such as enzymes, within the capsid or attached to the viral genome. Nucleic Acids Book. A free online book on the chemistry and biology of nucleic acids, written by Prof.

Tom Brown and Dr Tom Brown (Jnr). The book is ideal for chemistry and biology students and also provides practical information for researchers working in the lab. Manipulation of Nucleic Acids. Unit 2: The Genome 6. The Polymerase Chain Reaction 7.

Cloning Genes for Analysis 8. DNA Sequencing 9. Genomics and Systems Biology New Chapter to cover metagenomics, symbiosis, epigenomics etc.

Unit 3: The Central Dogma of Molecular Biology Cell Division and DNA Replication Transcription of Genes Nucleic acid hybridization can be used to detect homologous DNA or RNA sequences not only in cell extracts, but also in chromosomes or intact cells—a procedure called in situ hybridization (Figure ).

In this case, the hybridization of radioactive or fluorescent probes to specific cells or subcellular structures is analyzed by microscopic. Biology Test Practice Book areas: biochemistry, cell biology, and molecular biology and genetics. In addition to the total score, a subscore in each of these subfield areas is reported.

Because these Nucleic acid blotting and hybridization DNA cloning in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Molecular Biology, Second Edition, examines the basic concepts of molecular biology while incorporating primary literature from today’s leading researchers.

This updated edition includes Focuses on Relevant Research sections that integrate primary literature from Cell Press and focus on helping the student learn how to read and understand research to prepare them for the scientific world. Goringer’s brilliant new work dedicates a chapter to each of the main types of RNA editing – the very first volume to do so.

All of the sections here have been written by experts in the various research areas and a specific focus is put on the correlation between RNA structure and function, as well as on the complex cellular machineries that catalyze the different editing reactions.

If the virus has an envelope, glycoprotein spikes first adhere to plasma membrane receptors. The entire virus (not just the viral nucleic acid) is then taken into the host cell by endocytosis.

Once inside the host cell, the virus loses its envelope and capsid. The viral nucleic acid, now free of its covering, proceeds with biosynthesis.

Viruses are small nucleic acid units, either DNA or RNA, surrounded by a protective protein coat, or capsid, making them little more than packaged genes. Some viruses, such as influenza (flu), have a cloaking protein envelope, making it easier to penetrate a host cell.

Other viruses such as HIV also. "CELLULAR BIOLOGY, NUCLEIC ACIDS, AND VIRUSES." American Journal of Public Health and the Nations Health, 48(6), pp. – The two main types of nucleic acids are DNA and RNA. Both DNA and RNA are made from nucleotides, each containing a five-carbon sugar backbone, a phosphate group, and a nitrogen base.

DNA provides the code for the cell ‘s activities, while RNA converts that code into proteins to carry out cellular. Viruses: Viruses are not considered cells but exist as particles of nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) encased within a protein shell. Some viruses have an additional membrane called an envelope that is composed of phospholipids and proteins obtained from the cell membrane of a previously infected host cell.

d) Viruses are complexes of nucleic acid and proteins. Question 3 How much greater is the volume of a bacterial coccus cell of diameter 1 ìm, compared to that of an enveloped influenza virus with a radius of approximately 20 nm. The Chemical Biology of Nucleic Acids is an essential compendium of the synthesis of nucleic acids and their biological applications for bioorganic chemists, chemical biologists, medicinal chemists, cell biologists, and molecular biologists.

Reviews "This book will be a useful resource for post-graduates seeking to gain an overview of the. Coronavirus, any virus belonging to the family Coronaviridae. Coronaviruses have enveloped virions that measure approximately nm in diameter. The genome consists of a single strand of positive-sense RNA (ribonucleic acid).

Examples of coronaviruses include the agents that cause SARS and MERS. Other viruses utilize cellular proteins, e.g. the polyomavirus genome assumes a chromatin-like structure in association with four cellular histone proteins, H2A, H2B, H3 & H4, similar to that of the host cell genome.

genome from the large background of cellular nucleic acids.Other viruses contain an envelope that aids in cell entry, but also protects the virus from the host immune system.

The nucleic acid contains the genes of the virus and can be RNA or DNA.The DNA mimic, PNA (peptide nucleic acid), has been with us now for almost 3 decades. In the early s, scientists from Denmark, led by Prof. Peter Nielsen [1,2], invented a very clever DNA analog that replaced the entire sugar–phosphate backbone in DNA with a neutral backbone that consisted of glycine–ethylenediamine (aeg = N-(2-aminoethyl) glycine).